As we see how the next few weeks and months play out, more and more of us will be working and playing from home.  The Easter holidays and partial school closures mean the children are confined to the house for much of their day.  TV, iPads and gaming have their place, but for health, both physical and mental, keeping active is essential for everyone in the household.

What can you do?

You don’t have to be a specialist teacher or sports coach to try out fun fitness activities and games at home.  It’s great to use the extra time to let children play.  In our next blog, we will be sharing some easy physical activities you can undertake with your children as well as publishing some free content for parents and carers on our webpage.

In today’s blog, we are looking at getting outside.  If you have a garden, it’s an ideal opportunity to get out and spend some time in nature.   It doesn’t matter how big or small your outside space is, you may not even have an outdoor area but if you keep a distance from others it can be done.  You could work on the front pathway or in communal gardens.  Getting your hands dirty with the children helps pass the time and brings a host of benefits.

Benefits of spending time in the garden

10 garden activity ideas for children

Spring is finally in the air, so making the best of being at home by getting outside.   We have put together a list of ideas of things you can do in the garden with your children, or just for yourself!  Here at The PE Hub, we are now working from home so will be trying out some of these activities with you!

  1. Tidy the patio – it’s been a long winter and sweeping and clearing away clutter from last year will give you space and a sense of satisfaction.
  2. Paint plant pots – the children will love this and will give them some time to get creative with designs and colours.
  3. Plant herbs – Many herbs can be bought at the supermarket and online and is a great way to give children an understanding of where food comes from.
  4. Water painting – For younger children give them a paintbrush a bucket of water, and they will spend hours ‘painting’ wooden fences and sheds.
  5. Hang an insect feeder – Bees and butterflies are on the decline and are essential for the biodiversity of the planet, give them a helping hand with one of these attractive homes.
  6. Plant window boxes – This is great if you do not have a big garden or no garden at all some of the best plants are strawberries, chillies, tomatoes, annuals and tender perennials.
  7. Clean patio furniture – A bucket of warm soapy water and some sponges to bring the furniture back to life.  Old furniture can be spruced up with blankets and pillows.
  8. Decorate the garden – Add bunting, candles and windmills to give the garden a playful feel that children will enjoy.
  9. Make a still pool – Find any watertight container, not too deep and place in flower beds between plants, this is great for birds and other wildlife and looks pretty also.
  10. Build a scarecrow – Using things you find around the house and in the shed or garage can you make a scarecrow?  It doesn’t need to be big, but it will be lots of fun.

Still got time on your hands?  Why not try out this fun garden game.

Equipment

Different sized plastic plant pots.

Vocabulary

Build, stack, tower, tall, next, before, after, size, big, small, large, narrow, wide, on top.

Skills developed

Coordination, fine motor skills, balance, decision making, spatial awareness.

How to play

On the lawn or any open space lay out a selection of plastic plant pots.  Run through the variations below

Japan’s Olympic minister says the Tokyo 2020 Games could be postponed from the summer until later in the year amid fears over the coronavirus outbreak.

In a response to a question in Japan’s parliament, Seiko Hashimoto said Tokyo’s contract with the International Olympic Committee (IOC) “calls for the Games to be held within 2020”.

Read more.

Primary school children have been banned from heading in football training in England, Northern Ireland and Scotland.

The Football Associations of each country announced the ban on Monday and said a “graduated approach” will be taken to heading in training in under-12s to under-16s football.  The “updated Heading Guidance”, drawn up in conjunction with Uefa’s medical committee, states that children between the ages of 6 and 11 should no longer be allowed to head the ball during training sessions, read more.

The open letter, published on Tuesday, has been signed by the chief executives of major sports governing bodies and charities, including the Football Association, the English Cricket Board, England Athletics, the Lawn Tennis Association and the Youth Sports Trust.

It specifically urges Boris Johnson, Jeremy Corbyn and the other party leaders to outline measurable plans which will ensure that every young person “enjoys an hour a day of sport and physical activity, backed up by good quality teacher training and investment in school sport facilities”. Read More

Enter your details to receive information on how we work with schools & organisations like yours. Or if you have a question, either contact us or fill out the form. 

A PE curriculum map is a way of recording and tracking what you are teaching and when.  A curriculum plan should be a working document which ensures the content is suitable for each stage of a pupils learning journey.

Creating a good PE curriculum plan

By taking time out to forward plan, you can improve the quality of the pupils learning journey in several ways;

Communication and collaboration

If you are the PE Lead writing your PE curriculum plan, it is helpful to liaise with others, both senior management and your classroom colleagues.  Classroom teachers will help you understand the previous learning their pupils have undertaken so you can plan for progress.  Senior management will know about facility availability and any interruptions in curriculum time such as trips.  You can also use the school calendar to help schedule the best use of activity and facility.  Areas to consider when discussing your PE curriculum plan might include;

  1. What have you been teaching? What were the pupil outcomes?  Was good progress made, or are there areas that need to be revisited?
  2. Do you have specialist coaches in to help teach an activity area? How can you maximise this opportunity through your planning?  For example, teach the same activity the following half term to build on what the children have learnt or provide and extra-curricular opportunity.
  3. What is being taught in other areas of the curriculum? Where appropriate you can make meaningful cross-curricular links.
  4. What’s happening outside of school that you can bring into learning? For example, if the athletics world cup is happening in May, can you teach an athletics unit at the same time and draw links?

Analysing your PE curriculum

The new Ofsted inspection framework will be homing in on the curriculum schools have in place.  Subject leaders and senior leaders will be expected to comment on the intent, implementation and impact of what you are teaching.

Intent – is based on the content that the school or senior leaders expect the pupils to learn.  Intent will also look at the link between teaching across a time frame.  This is where your curriculum plan comes into its own.  The question being, if you’re teaching Year 3 Badminton in Autumn term 1 and Gymnastics in Autumn term 2, why?  Can you show what you expect the pupils to learn in that time?

Implementation – how are the lessons within your curriculum being taught? What are the similarities or differences between the teaching, for example, numeracy to PE and why?  How do these different approaches help children learn?  Are there any commonalities across the school’s teaching that pupils will expect in every lesson no matter what the subject area is?

Lastly, impact, which will focus less on assessment models and spreadsheets and more teachers’ ability to explain how they know their children are making progress.  To be able to answers these questions your curriculum and lesson intent should be crystal clear so you can tie pupil outcomes to learning intentions. For example, “the majority of the class were able to incorporate three or more rolls in a final performance piece after being taught a variety of rolls in isolation.”

So before you even pick up a pen or click a button, what is your intent for you PE curriculum and who is going to help you shape what’s taught, how will it be implemented and how will your teachers’ confidently demonstrate impact?

To learn more about how The PE Hub can help your school with its curriculum plan, check our video which demonstrates our easy to use curriculum plan builder.

Today we are delighted to announce a new partnership with Aspire Sports. This partnership will help Aspire continue to deliver their high-quality service delivery to hundreds of schools. The award-winning sports education company will also utilise our online PE planning hub to boost the skills and confidence of teaching staff that engage with their industry leading mentoring programme, PE Curriculum Support (PECS).

Mim Telfer, Co-Founder of The PE Hub commented “We are delighted to be working in Partnership with Aspire Sports to move forward our shared vision of creating a lifelong love of physical activity in children.  Through working together, we can increase our impact on the PE and School Sport landscape and play our part in supporting sustainable improvements to the quality of Physical Education.”

Aspire and The PE Hub are Association for Physical Education Business Associates and our resources and services are recognised by their Professional Development Board as approved providers. This partnership will benefit all Aspire team members who will have access to high-quality content that has been designed by teachers.

“Aspire are very excited to launch a new relationship with The PE Hub. As Birmingham based businesses, we’ve known each other for some time now. It’s clear that our vision for the sector is perfectly aligned and we will help each other move PE forwards.” says Paul Griffiths, Director at Aspire Sports.

“There’s a physical inactivity crisis. We know active children do better and we know that the first ten years of a child’s life provides a critical window for creating a lifelong commitment to physical activity. Exposing children to high-quality PE lessons is a very important part of primary school life.”

About The PE Hub

The PE Hub give schools and teachers exclusive access to high-quality teaching content. Every single PE lesson we create is designed with the teacher in mind. Our lesson plans span an immense breadth of content across all the key stages, easily covering the recommended 2 hours of PE each week for children in primary schools nationally.

The PE Hub is an online PE information hub, designed for teachers, by teachers.  The PE Hub is leading the way as the trusted source of PE knowledge in the market. Our library of pre- planned lessons and films is designed to support anyone wanting to teach PE better.  We eliminate time consuming planning, make PE lesson mastery easier to achieve, and create more engaging and rewarding lessons for pupils.

By supporting schools with the knowledge, resources and tools their teachers need to master PE lesson delivery – and by constantly evolving the services and materials we offer – we aim to help elevate PE to a more central place in schools and in the national curriculum. That’s what we mean by moving PE forward.

About Aspire Sports

Today’s children may be the first generation to have a shorter life expectancy than their parents. Aspire is on a mission to change that.

We know active children do better and we know that the first ten years of a child’s life provides a critical window for creating a lifelong commitment to physical activity. Simply, if physical activity were a pill, doctors would be rushing to prescribe it!

Aspire do not prescribe magic pills. Instead, we inspire children to be physically active with services and resources that customers recommend, team members are proud of and organisations want to collaborate on.

Established in 2005, Aspire currently work with tens of thousands of children each week delivering a range of programmes to primary schools. The company also deliver training to teaching staff as well as providing high quality apprenticeship opportunities to the physical activity workforce. Recently they have collaborated with like-minded sports coaching organisations around the country to enhance the impact of their physically active learning programme, Maths on the Move. At present, 25 companies have purchased a licence to deliver this unique programme and they expect this to reach 40 within the next 12 months.

Enter your details to receive information on how we work with schools & organisations like yours. Or if you have a question, either contact us or fill out the form. 

“Schools are being advised to increase the length of their lunch breaks so that children have enough time to exercise, socialise and make healthy food choices.

The recommendation is one of many that has come out of an investigation looking at what a Welsh council can do to ensure children have the healthiest start in life possible.”

Read more

”The leaders of more than 30 top sporting organisations have called on the government to commit more money to improve sport in and outside school. It comes as ministers announce a long-awaited but limited action plan, including pilot trials to offer young people an hour of exercise a day.”

Read more….

BBC Children In Need have teamed up with Joe Wicks.  Joe is the new Schools Ambassador and is about to bring back his Schools Tour. To win a school visit from Joe to your schoolsign up for a FREE fundraising kit here: http://bit.ly/JoeWicksCIN

 

Enquire about our Lesson Plans

Enter your details to receive information on how we work with schools & organisations like yours. Or if you have a question, either contact us or fill out the form. 

“There is significant evidence to support the critical role of play, sport and physical education in increasing physical and mental health, developing character and life skills, improving cognitive performance, building social connectedness and promoting social mobility.”

Read More….

Enquire about our Lesson Plans

Enter your details to receive information on how we work with schools & organisations like yours. Or if you have a question, either contact us or fill out the form.