Reception Cooperate & Solve Problems Unit 1 Lesson 3

Learning Intentions

  1. Work for a sustained period to raise heart rate
  2. Replicate with some accuracy body shapes to represent numbers
  3. Work as a pair to demonstrate larger numbers

Success Criteria

  1. I can run around to make my heart beat faster
  2. I can try and form number shapes using my body
  3. I can work with a partner to make bigger numbers

National Curriculum Links

Are physically active for sustained periods

Literacy and Numeracy Links

Literacy: Communicating with a partner using correct numbers

Numeracy: Recognise numbers and replicate larger numbers with partner

Starter Activity

Number Islands – Using throw down spots or mats on the floor as a target to aim for, children should move freely around the playing area.  Children can move in a variety of ways, vary regularly such as jogging, sidestepping, bunny hops.  The activity should last 7-10 minutes and be high activity so pupils raise their heart rate.  Can they feel their heart beating in their chest?  Can pupils’ count beats over 20 seconds?

  • On the teacher’s command, children should group themselves in the number called for example number 3 on a target spot or mat
  • Start with a small number and increase in difficulty depending on class ability
  • Any children that are left out and unable to join a group should do the number of star jumps that correspond with the group size, e.g. 3

Extension: Once in the number group perform a simple balance, such as tuck, or on one foot etc.

Activity 1

Gym number shapes

  • Using the teacher’s number shapes resource card, take the children through each of the body shapes
  • Use the teaching points and demonstration to explain to the children how to create each body shape
  • Pair pupils up and give them a pupils’ resource card, ask children to work through numbers 1 to 10 helping each other to form the shapes

Activity 2

Partner gym number shapes

  • Once the pupils have had a chance to work through each of the numbers they should now work with a partner to create double-digit numbers
  • Starting with lower numbers up to 20, work through a range of double-digit numbers
  • Ensure pupils swap roles, so the same person is not always performing the 1 of 13, 18 or 19 for example

Extension:  Take away the resource card so they must show the numbers from memory.  Can they transfer the numbers from standing to laying on the mat?

User Information / School Name: / Postcode:
User Information / School Name: / Postcode:

Key Questions

  1. In what situations do we use number in everyday life?
  2. When might you need to write down a number?
  3. Can you say which number you found the most difficult to perform? Why did you find it hard?

Reception Cooperate & Solve Problems Unit 1 Lesson 3

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Learning Intentions

  1. Work for a sustained period to raise heart rate
  2. Replicate with some accuracy body shapes to represent numbers
  3. Work as a pair to demonstrate larger numbers
Chevron Icon

Success Criteria

  1. I can run around to make my heart beat faster
  2. I can try and form number shapes using my body
  3. I can work with a partner to make bigger numbers
Chevron Icon

National Curriculum Links

Are physically active for sustained periods

Chevron Icon

Literacy and Numeracy Links

Literacy: Communicating with a partner using correct numbers

Numeracy: Recognise numbers and replicate larger numbers with partner

Chevron Icon

Resources

Reception Cooperate & Solve Problems Unit 1 Lesson 3

Chevron Icon

Starter Activity

Number Islands – Using throw down spots or mats on the floor as a target to aim for, children should move freely around the playing area.  Children can move in a variety of ways, vary regularly such as jogging, sidestepping, bunny hops.  The activity should last 7-10 minutes and be high activity so pupils raise their heart rate.  Can they feel their heart beating in their chest?  Can pupils’ count beats over 20 seconds?

  • On the teacher’s command, children should group themselves in the number called for example number 3 on a target spot or mat
  • Start with a small number and increase in difficulty depending on class ability
  • Any children that are left out and unable to join a group should do the number of star jumps that correspond with the group size, e.g. 3

Extension: Once in the number group perform a simple balance, such as tuck, or on one foot etc.

Chevron Icon

Activity 1

Gym number shapes

  • Using the teacher’s number shapes resource card, take the children through each of the body shapes
  • Use the teaching points and demonstration to explain to the children how to create each body shape
  • Pair pupils up and give them a pupils’ resource card, ask children to work through numbers 1 to 10 helping each other to form the shapes
Chevron Icon

Activity 2

Partner gym number shapes

  • Once the pupils have had a chance to work through each of the numbers they should now work with a partner to create double-digit numbers
  • Starting with lower numbers up to 20, work through a range of double-digit numbers
  • Ensure pupils swap roles, so the same person is not always performing the 1 of 13, 18 or 19 for example

Extension:  Take away the resource card so they must show the numbers from memory.  Can they transfer the numbers from standing to laying on the mat?

User Information

School Name:
Postcode:

Key Questions

  1. In what situations do we use number in everyday life?
  2. When might you need to write down a number?
  3. Can you say which number you found the most difficult to perform? Why did you find it hard?