Beginners Swimming Lesson 11

Learning Intentions

  1. Push from side transition and into the doggy paddle
  2. Push from the side and shift into swimming on the back

Skill Development:Transition from glide to stroke

Success Criteria

  1. I can use my arms to move me through the water
  2. I can move my arms and legs at the same time
  3. I can push from the side and swim on to my back

National Curriculum Links

Able to perform simple swimming actions and link together

Literacy & Numeracy Links

Literacy: To be able to explain what is meant by the principle of gliding in the water
Numeracy: Count how long a partner can glide for

Starter Activity

Ring a ring of roses

The class stands in a circle facing each other with an arm’s length between each swimmer. If you have a larger class, you may wish to set up two smaller rings to fit into available space. Say the classic nursery rhyme out loud and get the children to follow along “Ring a ring of roses, a pocket full of posies, a tissue a tissue we all fall down”. For the fall down section the actions could be adapted to include:
Jump up, submerge under water, fall forward face in, fall backwards ears under etc

Skill Development

The transition from glide to stroke
Recap push and glide with the teaching points opposite and progressions below
Swimmers should use one arm to hold on to the side and the other to extend float out in front.

Progressions:

  1. Down to one float
  2. No float
  3. No armbands

TASK:Ask swimmers to push and glide as far as possible. Give them several attempts before moving through the progressions. Pair pupils up to measure distance, e.g. one swimmer attempts to push and glide for distance and their partner stands where they stop moving; repeat and see if they can beat their distance. Extension: If appropriate teacher may wish to bring in a competitive element to the activity.

Activity

Redo Assessment for Learning—Moving through the water
Using all the space can they move through the water, keeping their balance in a variety of ways including:

  • Running
  • Hopping on one foot
  • Bouncing
  • Bounding—submerging head
  • Striding
  • Side Step
  • Doggy Paddle

Extension:

  • Link movements together and transition from a bounce, to hop to bound and using glide from side etc.
  • Incorporate ‘Freeze’ so swimmers must stay as still as possible until teacher resumes movement
  • Throw in floating objects, can swimmers move around and collect?

Teaching Points

The transition from glide to stroke

  1. Hold side with both hands
  2. Taking a deep breath place face in the water and push feet away from the wall
  3. Push from the wall bring hands quickly round in front
  4. Before the glide slows down lift head and start moving arms and legs in full doggy paddle stroke

Key Questions

  1. How long could you glide for when your partner counted?
  2. Can you name one thing that helps you glide further?
  3. Can you describe a difference between swimming and gliding?
  4. Did you perform better in the final task than last time you did it?

Beginners Swimming Lesson 11

Chevron Icon

Learning Intentions

  1. Push from side transition and into the doggy paddle
  2. Push from the side and shift into swimming on the back

Skill Development:Transition from glide to stroke

Chevron Icon

Success Criteria

  1. I can use my arms to move me through the water
  2. I can move my arms and legs at the same time
  3. I can push from the side and swim on to my back
Chevron Icon

National Curriculum Links

Able to perform simple swimming actions and link together

Chevron Icon

Literacy & Numeracy Links

Literacy: To be able to explain what is meant by the principle of gliding in the water
Numeracy: Count how long a partner can glide for

Beginners Swimming Lesson 11

Chevron Icon

Starter Activity

Ring a ring of roses

The class stands in a circle facing each other with an arm’s length between each swimmer. If you have a larger class, you may wish to set up two smaller rings to fit into available space. Say the classic nursery rhyme out loud and get the children to follow along “Ring a ring of roses, a pocket full of posies, a tissue a tissue we all fall down”. For the fall down section the actions could be adapted to include:
Jump up, submerge under water, fall forward face in, fall backwards ears under etc

Chevron Icon

Skill Development

The transition from glide to stroke
Recap push and glide with the teaching points opposite and progressions below
Swimmers should use one arm to hold on to the side and the other to extend float out in front.

Progressions:

  1. Down to one float
  2. No float
  3. No armbands

TASK:Ask swimmers to push and glide as far as possible. Give them several attempts before moving through the progressions. Pair pupils up to measure distance, e.g. one swimmer attempts to push and glide for distance and their partner stands where they stop moving; repeat and see if they can beat their distance. Extension: If appropriate teacher may wish to bring in a competitive element to the activity.

Chevron Icon

Activity

Redo Assessment for Learning—Moving through the water
Using all the space can they move through the water, keeping their balance in a variety of ways including:

  • Running
  • Hopping on one foot
  • Bouncing
  • Bounding—submerging head
  • Striding
  • Side Step
  • Doggy Paddle

Extension:

  • Link movements together and transition from a bounce, to hop to bound and using glide from side etc.
  • Incorporate ‘Freeze’ so swimmers must stay as still as possible until teacher resumes movement
  • Throw in floating objects, can swimmers move around and collect?

Teaching Points

The transition from glide to stroke

  1. Hold side with both hands
  2. Taking a deep breath place face in the water and push feet away from the wall
  3. Push from the wall bring hands quickly round in front
  4. Before the glide slows down lift head and start moving arms and legs in full doggy paddle stroke

Key Questions

  1. How long could you glide for when your partner counted?
  2. Can you name one thing that helps you glide further?
  3. Can you describe a difference between swimming and gliding?
  4. Did you perform better in the final task than last time you did it?