Reception Body Management Unit 1 Lesson 4

Learning Intentions

  1. Can step and stride across different distances and change direction.
  2. Can create bridges and tunnels.
  3. Work with others to travel through tunnels.

Success Criteria

  1. I can take big and small steps.
  2. I can make a bridge and crawl through a tunnel.
  3. I can crawl and move with a beanbag.

National Curriculum Links

Begin to work with others to extend balance and coordination.

Literacy and Numeracy Links

Literacy:Follow ‘left’ and ‘right’ commands.
Numeracy:Counting group numbers.

Starter Activity

Crocodile Tag—Place several mats around the room which act as ‘islands’. On the teacher’s call of “Crocodile”, all children must run to an island. There should be a maximum amount of players allowed on each island– for example, four. If a player approaches an island that already has four people on it, they must run to another island. If there is no space on any island, the remaining players must perform a forfeit before the game restarts; e.g. three jumping jacks, three sit-ups etc.
Extension:Change the numbers of pupils allowed on the mats. Change the forfeits. Vary the way players move around e.g. jog, skip, jump, etc.

Activity 1

Steps, strides, hops and bounds
Coordinating themselves to move their legs and feet in different ways will help pupils to adapt to more complex situations as their games, gymnastics and dance experiences increase.
Spreading out cones across the playing are at various distances apart, ask the children to choose two cones to travel between in these ways:

  • Hop on one foot – switch feet, try short hops and longer hops; how high can they hop?
  • Stride—as big a stride as possible which is a walk so there is always one foot in contact with the ground.
  • Bound—extension from the stride which is similar to a run but with longer steps and achieving some height, both feet should come off the ground.
  • Tiny Steps— on tip toes pupils try and take as small steps as possible, ask them to try this slowly and quickly, what happens when they speed up?
  • Striding without knee bend—Movement must come from the hips to swing legs forward, hips face forward.

Extension:Include change of direction, this could be done on a command such as whistle or ‘left’ or ‘right’

Activity 2

Bridges and tunnels
Pair pupils up on a mat. Giving an example and demonstration, ask them to come up with as many ways as they can to make a bridge. A bridge is any way in which their body creates an arched shape with clear space between themselves and the ground. Different ways they could attempt to make a bridge include:

  • On knees and elbows
  • On hands and elbows
  • Crab
  • Shoulders and feet
  • One hand, one foot

Extension: Pupils work in pairs. One slides a beanbag through the tunnel created by their partner or one performs a bridge and the other crawls under. Attempt this for the various different types of bridges they have practised.

Teaching Points

Slide under low bridges, step high over bridge, hold bridge position steady so a partner can easily move over and under.

Key Questions

  1. Which way of traveling did you find easiest?
  2. Can you describe some differences between the different ways you moved around between the cones?
  3. Which body parts did you balance on to make your bridges?

Reception Body Management Unit 1 Lesson 4

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Learning Intentions

  1. Can step and stride across different distances and change direction.
  2. Can create bridges and tunnels.
  3. Work with others to travel through tunnels.
Chevron Icon

Success Criteria

  1. I can take big and small steps.
  2. I can make a bridge and crawl through a tunnel.
  3. I can crawl and move with a beanbag.
Chevron Icon

National Curriculum Links

Begin to work with others to extend balance and coordination.

Chevron Icon

Literacy and Numeracy Links

Literacy:Follow ‘left’ and ‘right’ commands.
Numeracy:Counting group numbers.

Reception Body Management Unit 1 Lesson 4

Chevron Icon

Starter Activity

Crocodile Tag—Place several mats around the room which act as ‘islands’. On the teacher’s call of “Crocodile”, all children must run to an island. There should be a maximum amount of players allowed on each island– for example, four. If a player approaches an island that already has four people on it, they must run to another island. If there is no space on any island, the remaining players must perform a forfeit before the game restarts; e.g. three jumping jacks, three sit-ups etc.
Extension:Change the numbers of pupils allowed on the mats. Change the forfeits. Vary the way players move around e.g. jog, skip, jump, etc.

Chevron Icon

Activity 1

Steps, strides, hops and bounds
Coordinating themselves to move their legs and feet in different ways will help pupils to adapt to more complex situations as their games, gymnastics and dance experiences increase.
Spreading out cones across the playing are at various distances apart, ask the children to choose two cones to travel between in these ways:

  • Hop on one foot – switch feet, try short hops and longer hops; how high can they hop?
  • Stride—as big a stride as possible which is a walk so there is always one foot in contact with the ground.
  • Bound—extension from the stride which is similar to a run but with longer steps and achieving some height, both feet should come off the ground.
  • Tiny Steps— on tip toes pupils try and take as small steps as possible, ask them to try this slowly and quickly, what happens when they speed up?
  • Striding without knee bend—Movement must come from the hips to swing legs forward, hips face forward.

Extension:Include change of direction, this could be done on a command such as whistle or ‘left’ or ‘right’

Chevron Icon

Activity 2

Bridges and tunnels
Pair pupils up on a mat. Giving an example and demonstration, ask them to come up with as many ways as they can to make a bridge. A bridge is any way in which their body creates an arched shape with clear space between themselves and the ground. Different ways they could attempt to make a bridge include:

  • On knees and elbows
  • On hands and elbows
  • Crab
  • Shoulders and feet
  • One hand, one foot

Extension: Pupils work in pairs. One slides a beanbag through the tunnel created by their partner or one performs a bridge and the other crawls under. Attempt this for the various different types of bridges they have practised.

Teaching Points

Slide under low bridges, step high over bridge, hold bridge position steady so a partner can easily move over and under.


Key Questions

  1. Which way of traveling did you find easiest?
  2. Can you describe some differences between the different ways you moved around between the cones?
  3. Which body parts did you balance on to make your bridges?