Year 5 Gymnastics Unit 1 Lesson 4

Learning Intentions

  1. Introduce partner counter balances
  2. Work together to complete trust exercise
  3. Create a short sequence that contains counter balances

Skill Development: Counter Balances

Success Criteria

  1. I can identify a counter balance
  2. I can perform a variety of counter balances
  3. I can use counter partner balance in a sequence

National Curriculum Links

Explore partner and counter balances

Literacy and Numeracy Links

Literacy: Using appropriate language work safely with a partner to perform partner and counter balances

Numeracy: Think about different sequencing options for an interesting partner and counter balance sequence

Starter Activity

To prepare children to take weight and to counter balance with other pupils.

Children should first take part in a pulse-raising activity jogging around the room. Recapping symmetrical and asymmetrical shapes, if the teacher calls symmetrical children should perform and symmetrical shape/balance if the teacher calls asymmetrical children should perform an asymmetrical shape/balance. Next, in pairs work through three different partner warm-up exercises:

1—In pairs holding hands, players need to step over each other’s arms without letting go

2— Sitting in tuck, partners link arms, roll onto their back then back into tuck

3—In front support position, plank walk in time with partner. In plank/front support position move forward moving hands and feet forward, keeping back straight. Try backwards and side to side.

Activity

Trust activities (also see gymnastics resource cards on the year 5 overview page for support techniques for partner and counter balances)

1—One partner one forms a wide base with the arms out ready to support their partner. Their partner 2 assumes strong body tension, so when they lean back, they do not bend in the middle, like a plank. Partner 2 slowly leans backwards; partner 1 places their outstretched arms to receive them.

2— In 3’s similar to number 1 trust activity. One player stands in the middle of two players, middle players falls back and are pushed gently forward to other player like a dial rocking between the two.— the middle player must keep their body in good tension; they should be stiff like a plank

Skill Development

Counter Balances (see teaching card for wrist grip)

In a counter balance, this requires children to counteract each others weight. Give children a series of cards that contain a variety of partner balances on for them to practise.

Activity: Paired balances Extension: Perform a sequence of counter balances

Teaching Points

Counter balance

  1. Body tension is required for counter balance to be successful; muscle should be tight
  2. Limbs, back and torso, should be straight and at full extension
  3. Move slowly in and out of balance
  4. Start with wider bases to make balances easier
  5. Communicate to partner to agree when to move

Key Questions

  1. Can you describe what a counter balance is?
  2. Why is it important to have the correct hold during a counter balance?
  3. Why is communication with your partner vital to performing a high-quality balance?

Year 5 Gymnastics Unit 1 Lesson 4

Chevron Icon

Learning Intentions

  1. Introduce partner counter balances
  2. Work together to complete trust exercise
  3. Create a short sequence that contains counter balances

Skill Development: Counter Balances

Chevron Icon

Success Criteria

  1. I can identify a counter balance
  2. I can perform a variety of counter balances
  3. I can use counter partner balance in a sequence
Chevron Icon

National Curriculum Links

Explore partner and counter balances

Chevron Icon

Literacy and Numeracy Links

Literacy: Using appropriate language work safely with a partner to perform partner and counter balances

Numeracy: Think about different sequencing options for an interesting partner and counter balance sequence

Year 5 Gymnastics Unit 1 Lesson 4

Chevron Icon

Starter Activity

To prepare children to take weight and to counter balance with other pupils.

Children should first take part in a pulse-raising activity jogging around the room. Recapping symmetrical and asymmetrical shapes, if the teacher calls symmetrical children should perform and symmetrical shape/balance if the teacher calls asymmetrical children should perform an asymmetrical shape/balance. Next, in pairs work through three different partner warm-up exercises:

1—In pairs holding hands, players need to step over each other’s arms without letting go

2— Sitting in tuck, partners link arms, roll onto their back then back into tuck

3—In front support position, plank walk in time with partner. In plank/front support position move forward moving hands and feet forward, keeping back straight. Try backwards and side to side.

Chevron Icon

Activity

Trust activities (also see gymnastics resource cards on the year 5 overview page for support techniques for partner and counter balances)

1—One partner one forms a wide base with the arms out ready to support their partner. Their partner 2 assumes strong body tension, so when they lean back, they do not bend in the middle, like a plank. Partner 2 slowly leans backwards; partner 1 places their outstretched arms to receive them.

2— In 3’s similar to number 1 trust activity. One player stands in the middle of two players, middle players falls back and are pushed gently forward to other player like a dial rocking between the two.— the middle player must keep their body in good tension; they should be stiff like a plank

Chevron Icon

Skill Development

Counter Balances (see teaching card for wrist grip)

In a counter balance, this requires children to counteract each others weight. Give children a series of cards that contain a variety of partner balances on for them to practise.

Activity: Paired balances Extension: Perform a sequence of counter balances

Teaching Points

Counter balance

  1. Body tension is required for counter balance to be successful; muscle should be tight
  2. Limbs, back and torso, should be straight and at full extension
  3. Move slowly in and out of balance
  4. Start with wider bases to make balances easier
  5. Communicate to partner to agree when to move

Key Questions

  1. Can you describe what a counter balance is?
  2. Why is it important to have the correct hold during a counter balance?
  3. Why is communication with your partner vital to performing a high-quality balance?