Year 6 Tag Rugby Lesson 5

Learning Intentions

  1. Communicating effectively when transitioning from attack to defence
  2. Use agility and speed to help defend

Skill Development: Transition from attack to defence

Success Criteria

  1. I can talk with my team to organise ourselves to change from attack to defence
  2. I can use a change of speed and direction to help defend

National Curriculum Links

  • Developing communication
  • Using flexibility and speed in game situations

Literacy and Numeracy Links

L Communicate effectively in competitive situations
N Estimate the distances & times they would cover applying different running speeds

Starter Activity

Team Up

  • Split the group into two and play two small games. Mark out an area 8x8m for each group. 2 players wearing a bib start with a ball between them, and they have to try and tag the other players by touching the player gently with the ball.
  • When a player gets tagged, they join the taggers.
  • The taggers are unable to run with the ball, and they can only tag when they are in possession of the ball—they must pass the ball between themselves.
  • When a player is tagged, ask them to put on a bib, so it is easy to distinguish who is on which team.
  • Play the game until everyone is tagged or limit it to two minutes and swap taggers.

Skill Development

Transitioning from attack to defence
An important principle for players to take on board is that of the ‘turnover’ and transitioning from being the attacking team to becoming the defending team. A ‘turnover’ is any way in which the attacking team lose the ball and become the defenders; this could be by an unforced error, e.g. accidentally dropping the ball or a forced error, for example, an attacker being tackled. How to play:

  1. Set pupils up in a group of four in an attacking ’Magic Diamond’ with the ball carrier at the front
  2. The four must jog on to the playing area up to the halfway zone all the way to the opposite back line where a defender will be waiting
  3. The ball carrier should bass the ball to the defender—this is acting as the moment of ‘turnover.’
  4. The attacking team must now fall back to form a defensive line across the width of the pitch
  5. The defender has now become the attacker and must finish off the skill drill by attempting to run untagged into the halfway zone – Be sure to rotate the pupils, so they each play every role at least twice

Extension: Turn in to a 4 v 4 game with one team starting as the attackers and one team as the defenders, the ball carrier handing the ball off to the defender on the opposite team. The attacking team fall back into a defensive line, and the defenders become attackers and must work together to get the ball into the halfway zone.

Rugby lesson plan diagram

Activity

Play 8 v 8/7 v 7 tag rugby game, awarding points for teams automatically appointing a captain and also for teams that are communicating well and listening to their captains. During the games rotate the player who is captain. Basic tag rugby rules apply;

  1. Can only tag the player with the ball
  2. The tagged player has three steps OR three seconds to pass the ball
  3. Once tagged the defender MUST give the tag back
  4. Dropping the ball forwards means the opposition has a free pass

Teaching Points

Transitioning from attack to defence

  1. Nominate one person to be in charge of where the defensive line should be (captain)
  2. Eye contact
  3. Loud, Clear Voice
  4. Aware of where the rest of your team are
  5. After the turn over keeping an eye on the new attacker and responding appropriately, e.g. moving in to tackle or cut off a run

Key Questions

  1. Why is it important to organise your team quickly into defensive positions?
  2. Being able to change speed and direction quickly helps our defending, Why?
  3. Why does putting one person in charge help the team to be organised quickly?

Year 6 Tag Rugby Lesson 5

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Learning Intentions

  1. Communicating effectively when transitioning from attack to defence
  2. Use agility and speed to help defend

Skill Development: Transition from attack to defence

Chevron Icon

Success Criteria

  1. I can talk with my team to organise ourselves to change from attack to defence
  2. I can use a change of speed and direction to help defend
Chevron Icon

National Curriculum Links

  • Developing communication
  • Using flexibility and speed in game situations
Chevron Icon

Literacy and Numeracy Links

L Communicate effectively in competitive situations
N Estimate the distances & times they would cover applying different running speeds

Chevron Icon

Resources

Year 6 Tag Rugby Lesson 5

Chevron Icon

Starter Activity

Team Up

  • Split the group into two and play two small games. Mark out an area 8x8m for each group. 2 players wearing a bib start with a ball between them, and they have to try and tag the other players by touching the player gently with the ball.
  • When a player gets tagged, they join the taggers.
  • The taggers are unable to run with the ball, and they can only tag when they are in possession of the ball—they must pass the ball between themselves.
  • When a player is tagged, ask them to put on a bib, so it is easy to distinguish who is on which team.
  • Play the game until everyone is tagged or limit it to two minutes and swap taggers.
Chevron Icon

Skill Development

Transitioning from attack to defence
An important principle for players to take on board is that of the ‘turnover’ and transitioning from being the attacking team to becoming the defending team. A ‘turnover’ is any way in which the attacking team lose the ball and become the defenders; this could be by an unforced error, e.g. accidentally dropping the ball or a forced error, for example, an attacker being tackled. How to play:

  1. Set pupils up in a group of four in an attacking ’Magic Diamond’ with the ball carrier at the front
  2. The four must jog on to the playing area up to the halfway zone all the way to the opposite back line where a defender will be waiting
  3. The ball carrier should bass the ball to the defender—this is acting as the moment of ‘turnover.’
  4. The attacking team must now fall back to form a defensive line across the width of the pitch
  5. The defender has now become the attacker and must finish off the skill drill by attempting to run untagged into the halfway zone – Be sure to rotate the pupils, so they each play every role at least twice

Extension: Turn in to a 4 v 4 game with one team starting as the attackers and one team as the defenders, the ball carrier handing the ball off to the defender on the opposite team. The attacking team fall back into a defensive line, and the defenders become attackers and must work together to get the ball into the halfway zone.

Rugby lesson plan diagram
Chevron Icon

Activity

Play 8 v 8/7 v 7 tag rugby game, awarding points for teams automatically appointing a captain and also for teams that are communicating well and listening to their captains. During the games rotate the player who is captain. Basic tag rugby rules apply;

  1. Can only tag the player with the ball
  2. The tagged player has three steps OR three seconds to pass the ball
  3. Once tagged the defender MUST give the tag back
  4. Dropping the ball forwards means the opposition has a free pass

Teaching Points

Transitioning from attack to defence

  1. Nominate one person to be in charge of where the defensive line should be (captain)
  2. Eye contact
  3. Loud, Clear Voice
  4. Aware of where the rest of your team are
  5. After the turn over keeping an eye on the new attacker and responding appropriately, e.g. moving in to tackle or cut off a run

Key Questions

  1. Why is it important to organise your team quickly into defensive positions?
  2. Being able to change speed and direction quickly helps our defending, Why?
  3. Why does putting one person in charge help the team to be organised quickly?